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Developing competence in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

Overview and goals

What does being competent in science, technology, engineering and mathematics mean? Does it make sense to consider an unique competence covering four different areas? How can the students develop that competence? What strategies, resources and tools can teachers use? This course aims introduce and give examples of actions and tasks that provide opportunities to develop STEM competence in students. We will explore in detail problems of modeling and some aspects of scientific inquiry, as well as we will discuss the use of technology to gather data from surroundings and thus propose contextualized and authentic tasks

Goals:
- Understand the foundations, features and capabilities of the areas of mathematical competence, basic competences in science and engineering, and technology from a holistic point of view
- Identify and analyze good practices for the development of STEM in students from different educational levels
- Propose tasks of mathematical modeling and scientific inquiry
- Locate and use repositories of resources to design learning activities on STEM

Content

PART 1: LA COMPETENCIA STEM. SIGNIFICADO E IMPLICACIONES

  1. 1.1. Meaning of STEM
  2. 1.2. STEM in the international education field
  3. 1.3. Authenticity and realism in school tasks

PART 2: MODELING IN MATHS AND SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY

  1. 2.1. Mathematical modeling. Phases, types and fundamentals
  2. 2.2. Teaching and learning science by inquiring

PART 3: USE OF SENSORS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DATA GATHERING

  1. 3.1. Modeling with the use of technology
  2. 3.2. Robotics: advances and open questions

Assessment

Assessment criteria and instruments - Attendance, active involvement, daily work: 40 % (Due to the theoretical and practical nature of the course, regular class attendance is essential. To qualify for the assessment of the course is considered indispensable attending at least 80% of classes) - Partial test: 30 % - Final test: 30 %

References

  1. Appel, K., Bakken, C., Gastineau, J. & Vernier, D. (2013). Physics with Vernier. Beaverton, OR: Vernier Software & Technology.
  2. Cañas, A., Martín-Díaz, M. J. y Nieda, J. (2007). Competencia en el conocimiento y la interacción con el mundo físico. La competencia científica. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.
  3. Gastineau, J., Brueningsen C., Bower, B., Antinone, L. & Kerner, E. (2011). Real-World Math with Vernier. Connecting Math and Science. Beaverton, OR: Vernier Software & Technology.
  4. Laboy-Rush, D. (2011). Integrated STEM Education through Project-Based Learning. Recuperado el 10 de febrero de 2014 de http://www.rondout.k12.ny.us/common/pages/DisplayFile.aspx.
  5. Lantz Jr, H. B. (2009). Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education what form? What function? Recuperado el 26 de febrero de 2013 de https://dornsife.usc.edu/assets/sites/1/docs/jep/STEMEducationArticle.pdf
  6. Maaß, K. (2006). What are modelling competencies? ZDM, 38(2), 113-142.
  7. Mata, C. (2014). Un estudio de casos para evaluar la competencia STEM. Trabajo Fin de Máster. Universidad de Granada.
  8. Moore, M., Carter, D., Andersen, B. & Windle, T. (2009). Ciencia en la Primaria con Vernier. Beaverton, OR: Vernier Software & Technology.
  9. Rico, L. y Lupiáñez, J. L. (2008). Competencias matemáticas desde una perspectiva curricular. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.